Located on Main St. in downtown Sarasota, just past the intersection of Main and Orange, the Drunken Poet Cafe is reinventing Japanese and Thai cuisine.

Check out our menu by clicking here. No matter what you have, you’ll absolutely love the great atmosphere and contemporary dining experience at the Drunken Poet Cafe. See you soon!

We’re proud to announce that we have been nominated for “Sarasota’s Best Sushi” for 2008. Have a cup of one of our premium Sakes, and enjoy some of the best Sushi this side of the pond!

By Chef Judi Gallagher

Several years ago I remember trying Drunken Poet on Main Street and really enjoying my lunch. I also remember taking a photo of chef-owner Oy’s herb garden just outside the restaurant.  

Well, what the heck took me so long to go back? I have been missing so much goodness. I solemnly pledge to enjoy delicious sushi and Thai food at Drunken Poet more often. Well, thanks to the Edible Sarasota team for inviting me to dinner, because wow: What a flavorful, packed feast it was. The dumplings are delicate, the veggie rolls are crisp with fresh cabbage and sweet dipping sauce, and the curries–they’re a dream.

To read the complete article from Sarasota Magazine.

Oy Punyahotra broke the rules when she opened Drunken Poet Café. She was supposed to remain a doctor, to play life safely, and to follow what Thai culture and her parents told her was the standard recipe for success.

But there came a day when the Bangkok- born Punyahotra decided it was time to trade convention for true passion. That day was Dec. 5, 2006, the 79th birthday of the king of Thailand (Bhumibol Adulyadej). It was Drunken Poet’s first birthday. In a way, it was also Punyahotra’s birthday.

“I’m a pharmacist; that’s what I studied to become. I have always loved food since I was little, but in my family and in Thailand, the mentality has always been: If you’re not a doctor, you’re good for nothing,” Punyahotra says. That mentality did not work for Punyahotra; she had something else in mind.

With dishes to suit all tastes, sophisitcated dining has never been so much fun! Try the Poet’s famous “Sexy Man Roll” to explore new flavors, or order the Pad Thai for a traditional dish with an awesome presentation.

Located on Main St. in downtown Sarasota, just past the intersection of Main and Orange, the Drunken Poet Cafe is reinventing Japanese and Thai cuisine.

Check out our menu by clicking here. No matter what you have, you’ll absolutely love the great atmosphere and contemporary dining experience at the Drunken Poet Cafe. See you soon!

“Friendly Café, Sexy Sushi”

We’re proud to announce that we have been nominated for “Sarasota’s Best Sushi” for 2008. Have a cup of one of our premium Sakes, and enjoy some of the best Sushi this side of the pond!

The menu at Drunken Poet is small but of very good quality. Starters include standards like Shrimp ($8.95) or Vegetable ($5.95) Tempura, Chicken Satay ($5.95), Spring Rolls ($3.95), Seafood Spring Roll ($6.95), and for those fond of soybeans, Edamame ($4.25).

An evening’s special was Green Papaya Salad ($9.95), a Thai staple. It arrived rather dramatically, a sizeable portion served in a large stone mortar, the salad mixing finely julienned papaya and carrot. Diners have a choice of spiciness based on a scale of one to five.

A four enlivened the salad and created a delectable interplay among the coolness of the papaya, the tartness of lime and the heat of the peppers. There were some tomatoes included, too, but these didn’t really contribute to the success of the dish.

A Seaweed Salad ($5.25) didn’t quite match the performance of the papaya but was nevertheless refreshing, with sesame seeds providing a light crunchiness.

The Drunken Poet offers a number of soups. Tom Yum Goong ($4.50) uses lemongrass and lime for a tart, invigorating taste. It is robust, too, with generous amounts of mushroom and shrimp swimming in the broth.

The number of main courses at Drunken Poet is small but intriguing. Tamarind plays a key role in a number of them, as in Gai Bai Teuy ($15.95), which wraps marinated chicken in a bai teuy leaf (also known as bai toey, or pandanus leaf) and serves it with a homemade tamarind sauce.

Tamarind also figures in Duck Tamarind ($19.95). Although crispy duck is standard on many Asian menus, Drunken Poet’s version proves memorable for several reasons. First, the skin is deliciously crispy and crunchy. Pan-fried green onions add another layer of crispness and a hint of bitterness that perfectly complements the slightly sweet tamarind sauce. Although tamarind is sour and tart in its natural state, the sauce for theduck is reminiscent of currant or black cherry sauce, with an exotic edge. Altogether, the preparation is a delightfully different way to eat duck.

Among the seafood, tamarind appears again in Scallop Tamarind ($21.95). It doesn’t show up, however, in Seafood Paradise ($23.95), where the dominant flavoring is instead basil. In this dish scallops, shrimp, calamari and mussels are sauteed, then covered with a rich, dark sauce full of basil leaves. In cuisines like Italian, basil is minced and used as an accent, but in Thai dishes like this one it assumes a bold presence, its sharp, minty flavor making an unexpected pairing for the seafood.

The night we were there, dessert consisted of Sticky Rice with Mango ($7.95). This sticky rice is black and has a slightly sweet nutty flavor that complements the juicy mango. A thread of coconut milk over the fruit adds yet another dimension of taste — together the three create a flavor that is both subtle and satisfying.

Service throughout the evening was gracious, prompt and attentive.